Army Slides Show Cuts to Readiness, Support, Reset

Army briefing slides for an upcoming White House meeting go into detail about the impacts Sequestration cuts will have on the Army's ability to fight in the near term.

A set of Army briefing slides outlining the devastating effects of Sequestration has mysteriously surfaced and is circulating the Web just two days before senior leaders are scheduled to present them to the White House.

“Effects of FY13 Fiscal Uncertainty on Army OMA Accounts” lays out the potential funding cuts to the service operations and maintenance efforts.

The Pentagon is facing $5.3 billion in Sequestration cuts in March if Congress cannot find a way to prevent the mandatory spending reductions. All of the services will likely have to furlough hundreds of thousands of workers, cut back on contractor logistics support, freeze sustainment of thousands of vehicles and other equipment and gut training.

The services are scheduled to present their plans to the White House on Friday. Here are the highlights of potential financial impacts of Sequestration and other shortfalls the Army is facing in the coming months:

– Only deploying units in Afghanistan, Korea and the division ready brigade will be allowed to conduct readiness training. All other units will conduct collective small unit training in first part of fiscal 2014. That means 78 percent of non-deploying brigade combat teams will be ill-prepared for future contingency operations.

– Interrupts timeline for pulling vehicles and equipment out of Afghanistan and delays reset of $20 billion in post war equipment needed for future operations.

– No new depot maintenance orders issued beyond January. This could affect units in Alaska, Georgia, Hawaii, Colorado, Kentucky, Louisiana, New York and North Carolina and delay the repair and reset of 1,300 tactical vehicles, 14,000 radios and 17,000 weapons.

– 250,000 Army civilians would be furloughed for up to 22 days.

– 5,000 contract, temporary and term employees would be released.

– 21 of the Army’s 26 major acquisition priorities could incur significant Nunn-McCurdy breaches, affecting 300 contractors and 1000 suppliers in 40 states.

– $2.5 billion worth of contractor logistics support would be unfunded, impacting counter improvised explosive device operations, intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance and aviation operations.

The slides also state that the Army “will not compromise” on $25 billion war spending. This includes $1.3 billion in “critical family programs.