Policy

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Top OSD Officials Think Tanker Deal Can Go Ahead

UPDATE: We’ve gotten a rocket from the Pentagon, saying that John Young, the Pentagon’s head weapon’s buyer, has not decided to go ahead with the tanker rebid. However, our source on this issue advises that we wait this one out before issuing a correction. So we will. Colin 3 p.m. Wednesday.


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Hot Hire for Top Defense Lobby

Fred Downey, military legislative aide to Sen. Joseph Lieberman (I-Conn.), will be joining the Aerospace Industries Association as vice president of national security at the end of this month.It is refreshing to see the biggest defense industry lobby has made a very smart hire.


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Shakeup at OSD Acquisition Complete

John Young, undersecretary of defense for acquisition, technology and logistics (in the picture), is trying to do something lasting about it by signing a memo by the end of the week creating a new director-level position –- one of only seven in the department reporting directly to him –- for space and intelligence capabilities.


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Top Congressional Money Man Dismisses Gates Heritage Speech

Gates’ May 13 message was heard loud and clear on the Hill. A few days later, the top defense appropriator — read money man — in the House of Representatives boldly stepped in front of the nation (also known as the floor of the House) and said Gates’ speech was “simply a rationalization of short-term budget decisions made in the waning months of this Administration.


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Roles and Missions Review Underway

At a Pentagon briefing May 9, two senior defense officials discussed how they will approach the new roles and missions work, outlining the seven main areas of focus. The one issue Congress told the Pentagon to study is whether there are unnecessary duplications of capabilities among and between the four services and other arms of the Pentagon.


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Tanker Ruling Shows Air Force in Disarray

The decision to uphold the Boeing protest of the airborne tanker award to Northrop Grumman Corp. raises fundamental questions about the ability of the Air Force — and the Pentagon in general — to buy weapons effectively, according to lawmakers, congressional aides and defense analysts.